COMMENTARY -- I got a phone call during my morning show today. A man was on the other end, obviously distraught.

He was asking me for help. He wondered if I could appeal to listeners to help him financially. He said he was a diabetic, his wife was sick and they had a young child. He said he barely made rent, had no money for food and no gas in his car.

I was live in the studio, seconds away from going back on the air. I felt helpless. It would have been against the law had I opened the mic and asked for money for this guy, a fire-able offense.

I mumbled something about him talking to our promotions and public service department when they arrived at 8 a.m. (this was 7:10 a.m. when he called). I wanted to help, but was in an awkward position. The best I could do was refer him and go back on the air and pretend it didn't happen.

That was nearly impossible.

At this point in life, inflation has put a dent in our family's budget, but we are still O.K. We make enough money, and have much fewer expenses than our younger years.

But his phone call struck home for me. Not that long ago, I was in his shoes. Young, hard-working, but broke. We skimmed by, barely making our budget while using things like WIC, family loans and free meals when we could.

Senator Mike Lee lays it out for us all. On average, Utah families are paying $750 more for the exact same goods and services as just a year ago. 750 bucks!!!

How can a young, hard-working and honest family man make it?

And what happens if (like one caller on my morning show said) things keep getting progressively worse?

Most of us are O.K. now, but what about when gas hits seven dollars ... or nine dollars ... or 12?!

And what about those on fixed incomes? Those who hoped to have Mom home to take care of the kids? Those who dream of having their own homes?

The way things are going, they're in trouble.

The way things are going, we're all in trouble.